Happyness Quote Day 31 – Gratitude

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Let gratitude be the pillow upon which you kneel to say your nightly prayer.

Maya Angelou


When we appreciate all that we have in life, our egos step out of the way, inviting even greater abundance into our lives.
Practicing gratitude for our lives – for the air we breathe, for our magnificent bodies, and the beauty of being alive – is a wonderful place to start. From this, we can expand outward, like ripples in a still pond, appreciating everything and everyone we encounter and those who touch our lives as well.
What are you thankful for today?

Greetings of Moonlight

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Standing by my window

On my most special day;

I looked up in the night sky

And saw the bare moonlight.

I haven’t watched it so often

But I know it exists.

I cherished its presence

Before I bid good night.

It whispered me a message

To remind me of today;

For the many blessings I received

It’s a bliss to always remember.

NaPoWriMo Day 30 – Cruising with Words

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Hail, ye, the fulfillment of this dare filled my very soul
Euphoric passion and lavished praise for the 30 poems
Letting the seed grow in the grounded heart
Liberated the words for jewels to flaunt, and
Orchestrated a chain to entangle my thoughts.
 
Good Lord, grant me the wisdom to pursue
On this cruise I set out to the ocean of words
One prompt to another was like a mystery solved
Deliberately rhymed and versed to satisfy my whim
By and by, next April spring will come too soon
Yearning that the seed has grown with a solid trunk
Earnestly I wait, and patiently I learn.

With over 1500 participants for NaPoWriMo this year, it was indeed a very good season.

And so now for our final prompt, we are challenged to write a poem of farewell since today befits the final poem. It is not necessarily a goodbye-forever poem, NaPoWriMo will be back again next year. For a little inspiration, here’s selections of goodbye-and-good-luck poems from the Poetry Foundation website.

NaPoWriMo Day 29 – Into the Sun

Sunrise Nature – Credits here

Sun rises like a candle flame that blankets the heavens
And steps are laid upon the mountain range where I run.
I smell the misty scent of the morning breeze
That cause me to hear the chirping birds around,
And hear the winds dancing through the clouds.
Is Nirvana the heavens we call?

Sun emerges with the flame of fire that consumes the horizon
And stones are formed of the cottons grey where noise I heard.
Scorching wind start to race to bathe Sodom with its hate.
From ashes to ashes, dust to dust, the city is doomed not to last.
You hear the cries with the voices creep, Sylviana was there.
Is this Nirvana, the heavens we call?

The motley faces of emotions embody the sun -
With a heart-pouring temper, balloon can burst,
Or with its gentle-touch of rays tame a raging waves.
“Fly up to the sky, WoMM, and reach for the sun,”
She notes to herself while strangely subdued.
Make a wish in the money tree so your troubles go away.

With the sun as an angel, the guiding light.
Act on your visions, and see your dreams coming by –
Heavens rejoice and your angel triumphs.
Flap your wings - wide and strong, then soar up and high,
When find yourself flat on the ground
Never let the raging fire consumes your soul.

“Nur wer es wagt, gewaltig zu scheitern,
kann je wirklich groβen Erfolg haben.”
If you look towards the sky, the heavens never move.
Get-up! Hold onto your wheel and drive through distance
Gain that sacred momentum while you’re below,
Keeping your eyes to that crystal of light where dreams reside.

It’s Day 29 of the NaPoWriMo and we are working on a prompt called “Twenty Little Poetry Projects,” originally developed by Jim Simmerman. It really forces us into details, and to work on “conducting” the poem as it grows, instead of trying to force the poem to be one thing or another in particular. And here are the twenty little projects themselves — the challenge is to use them all in one poem:

1. Begin the poem with a metaphor.
2. Say something specific but utterly preposterous.
3. Use at least one image for each of the five senses, either in succession or scattered randomly throughout the poem.
4. Use one example of synesthesia (mixing the senses).
5. Use the proper name of a person and the proper name of a place.
6. Contradict something you said earlier in the poem.
7. Change direction or digress from the last thing you said.
8. Use a word (slang?) you’ve never seen in a poem.
9. Use an example of false cause-effect logic.
10. Use a piece of talk you’ve actually heard (preferably in dialect and/or which you don’t understand).
11. Create a metaphor using the following construction: “The (adjective) (concrete noun) of (abstract noun) . . .”
12. Use an image in such a way as to reverse its usual associative qualities.
13. Make the persona or character in the poem do something he or she could not do in “real life.”
14. Refer to yourself by nickname and in the third person.
15. Write in the future tense, such that part of the poem seems to be a prediction.
16. Modify a noun with an unlikely adjective.
17. Make a declarative assertion that sounds convincing but that finally makes no sense.
18. Use a phrase from a language other than English.
19. Make a non-human object say or do something human (personification).
20. Close the poem with a vivid image that makes no statement, but that “echoes” an image from earlier in the poem.

For beginner like me, some are easy to follow, while some others I’m very much confused. I may need to study all the literary devices to understand them. I may have completed the Twenty or not, I am having fun while writing it.

~MyMae

NaPoWriMo Day 25 – Little by Little

Little by little
 I hear a singing lyrebird
 Sits on a tree-top

Little by little
 She mimics my song of love
 Springs from my heart

Little by little
 A hunter wanders nearby
 Walks toward my route

Little by little
 He renders a lullaby
 Waits for my sleep

Little by little
 He whispers song of spell
 Poisons of my heart

Little by little
 The lyre mutes on the tree-top
 Falls that very swift

Anaphora is a literary term for the practice of repeating certain words or phrases at the beginning of multiple clauses or, in the case of a poem, multiple lines. The phrase “A time to,” as used in the third Chapter of Ecclesiastes, is a good example of anaphora. This post by Rebecca Hazelton on the Poetry Foundation’s blog gives other great examples of anaphora in action, from Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech to Homer Simpson.

So today, NaPoWriMo challenges us to write a poem that uses anaphora. When you feel like time is moving fast, and you want the movements of events to go slow, I thought of the phrase “Little by Little”.

NaPoWriMo Day 19 – Whimsical Night

It’s Day 19 and we’re going silly. NaPoWriMo prompt challenge is to use one or more of actual sea shell names from the list given to us. Guess what, it’s also a rubaiyat. I never thought sea shell names are that fanciful. Can you spot the names in the poem?


 

One dreary night in the empty basement

Leather Donax played with his new dart

Holding a Woody Canoebubble beer in one hand

He never noticed the angry Shoulderblade Sea Cat.


His body was hidden under the Heavy Bonnet

Impatiently looking with Unequal Bittersweet

Then popped from the Snout Otter Clam – 

A Triangular Nutmeg with Strawberry Top of heart.